Georgia law schools online

Georgia law schools online are the overlooked solution to the current law education crisis. The job market has imploded while tuition has exploded, leaving students brilliant but unable to pay over $100,000 loan debt. The Georgia law schools online, however, offer as low as one-sixth the regular tuition.

The problem to this easy fix is that state’s high court, which in 1987 required ABA accreditation to be able to take the bar. This was part of a nationwide movement during law’s bubble. The American Bar Association has so many capricious requirements that it is impossible to run a law school on the low end of the market.

Georgia law schools online John Marshall Law School Atlanta[/caption]

Consider John Marshall Law School, unaccredited since 1933 and serving working class students. The Atlanta-based school had no other option but to sell to a private concern, which re-oriented the school and jacked up tuition to placate the ABA. It finally won accreditation in 2009 but not without sacrificing its mission of serving the lower income masses.

Is that good for the country? The ABA estimates that 80% of the nation’s poor are unserved by lawyers. Naturally, no one CAN serve them because lawyers need to charge $250 an hour to pay off his debt and make a decent living. Current reform being considered are not enough (downsizing student populations, cutting law school to two years). The ABA needs to get out of accreditation business entirely because it doesn’t benefit students or law clients; it benefits law professors by fattening their wallets.

America used to be free. The bar determined who could act as a lawyer. Pass the test, hang your shingle. But in Georgia like most states, you’re not even allowed to take the test if you don’t graduate from an ABA-accredited school. Have we forgotten that Abraham Lincoln studied at home by candlelight to become a lawyer? Today’s requirements would bar our most loved president.

Options for Georgia law schools online:

  • Take the California bar because that forward-looking state allows all comers.
  • Practice five years in California and then request “by motion” to take Georgia’s bar
  • Sue for special permission to take Georgia’s bar (Ross Mitchell did this successfully in Massachusetts)
  • Write your bar expressing your outrage at the monopoly they enforce for law schools

In this Jan. 25 Bloomberg Law video, a New York University law professor proposes eliminating the third year of law schools to cut down student debt. Tuition has doubled since 2000.

Where are the proposals to cut down on excessive ABA requirements which drive tuition up?