Indiana law degree online

Indiana law degree online ought to be the choice of preference. But it faces difficulties from the the powers that be who are more interested in conserving their privilege and less interested in actually helping students.

What do we mean? Indiana requires you to graduate from an ABA-approved law school to take the bar, and that pretty much rules out online schools, whose advantages are obvious.

An Indiana law degree online benefits:

  • The poor. Not only students but poor clients. If my law education is affordable, that means I can charge less for my services. The ABA estimates 80% of America’s poor have no access to a lawyer, yet its efforts to address this deficiency are feeble at best.
  • The worker who dreams of switching careers. You can study at night, rewind tape, interact with professors and students via email, video-conference and chat.

Who benefits from “barring from the bar” online students?

  1. Posh law schools
  2. Law professors who make upwards of $200,000 a year
  3. Lawyers who have a job and want to limit competition

Applications to traditional law schools have dropped 30% because reduced job opportunities no longer justify uncontrollably high tuitions. Understandably, law schools are doing everything in their power to maintain tuitions high, including limiting student populations and trying to put the brakes on new law school openings, like Indiana Tech.

Indiana law degree online

While law schools scramble to rationalize their privilege (watch Harvard speakers do this in the video), the discussion has essentially been sidelined to open up law education to free competition. Why is the Indiana law degree online barred? A lot of hemming and hawing is going on to answer that.

Under current regulations, you need to explore options:

  • Pass the bar in California, which unlike the rest of the nation allows online grads to attempt the bar.
  • Then, practice in California. After a few years, you can request to take the bar in Indiana.
  • Use your law degree to enhance another professional career (without passing the bar).
  • Raise hell with your state bar to overturn the monopoly.

Are law schools in crisis? Well, the world is in crisis. There’s an opportunity to rethink what we’re doing.” — from the video

The video shows a feisty Harvard Law School panel discussion titled “Are Law Schools in Crisis? The New York Times Editorial and its Discontents”

Nebraska law school online

Nebraska law school online is the uncelebrated future of law education. As lawyers come to grips with the new legal landscape and realize law’s heyday is over, a reshaping of legal education inevitably will include more online classes.

Currently there is no Nebraska law school online. Most of the online options are in California, which has been quick to embrace new technologies and allow online students to take its bar. Nebraska limits bar-takers to only graduates from ABA-approved law schools. That rules out online schools.

Mired in outmoded traditions from the 80s and 90s, the American Bar Association imposes so many requirements on its 200 accredited schools that they are forced to charge astronomical tuitions. Most private law school grads grapple with $100,000+ debt in student loans.

At the same time, 80% of America’s rural and poor population go unserved by lawyers, according to ABA estimates. This happens as a direct result of lawyers’ need to pay off debts by charging $250 an hour. The ABA accreditation process does benefits neither clients nor students. It benefits plush law schools and their wealthy professors.

While law jobs were booming, tuitions doubled since the year 2,000. But now the recession and the internet have popped the law bubble. Six-digit incomes are rare; law grads from elite schools abound. Creighton, like many schools nationwide, is attempting to redress this glut by limiting the number of students. Laudable? Not quite. Over the short term, they lose money. But by limiting their student population, they raise their bar passage rate, thus raising their ranking and drawing in more students (and more money) over the long term.

Nebraska law school online

However, virtually no law school is addressing the real need: to lower tuition drastically. In essence, Nebraska and most states are preserving a monopoly by requiring ABA-accreditation to even to take the bar. (Wasn’t the bar the test to see if you could be a competent lawyer? So why exclude online law grads from taking the test?)

Joe Queenan of the Wall Street Journal compared law school tuition to a Nigerian scam. “This scheme promises its gullible victims immense wealth and a brilliant future. It promises jobs that don’t exist and careers that will never materialize. It offers degrees that are useless outside the state in which they were issued, and not much use inside. At the end of the line, the mark, often hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt, is left penniless.”

If you’re considering the Nebraska law school online, you need to examine your options:

  1. Take the bar in California
  2. Practice law in California
  3. Transfer to Nebraska after a few years by soliciting the bar “by motion”
  4. Fight to change the bar’s opposition to a Nebraska law school online

In reality, the online option is great because:

  • It’s dramatically cheaper — up to one-sixth the price.
  • It’s flexible and convenient. You watch your lecture when you can. You can rewind it and hear it again if there’s something you didn’t quite understand on the first pass.
  • It involves state-of-the-art technology. You can access law libraries, professors and fellow students through email, video conference, chat, etc.
  • Such classes have been wildly embraced by other academic disciplines, but the ABA looks like cavemen for rejecting it.

In this video, the speaker gives strategies to reduce stress for law students.

Legal studies program online: an advance in your career

Legal studies program online has met resistance from traditionalists, but it is natural that education evolves and adapts to new realities. Just like when Gutenberg invented the printing press it totally revolutionized learning and knowledge, so too the internet has been disruptive to the hallowed halls of education.

Legal studies program online

A buyer-beware attitude is fine. As critics point out, top law firms probably won’t be beating down your door to give you a job upon graduation. Legal studies programs online have had difficulty with students passing the bar. A major obstacle has been that most states don’t even let you take the bar with an online degree (California is the notable exception!).

But what naysayers don’t tell you is that traditional schools aren’t free from problems. An April 2013 Los Angeles Times article reports that law students have sued their traditional law schools in about 20 different suits around the country for presenting misleading post-graduation job statistics. Grads who bussed tables were reported as “employed within nine months after graduation.”

A New York Times article documents how traditional law schools manipulate their data to rise in U.S. News & World Report’s rankings, which leads to more applications and more donations. In one case, a dean classified low LSAT students as “part time” to drastically improve his bar passage stats of “full time” students.

So if a buyer-beware attitude is to predominate, let it apply to the traditional schools also.

Good news appears on the horizon for the legal studies program online. The American Bar Association is currently re-examining its anti-internet bias as part of comprehensive changes that are being sparked by plunging applications to traditional law schools.

The advantages of the legal studies program online are:

  • Affordability – With the exception of Washington U.’s foray into the online market, tuition is one-third or one-fourth the cost of the brick-and-mortar schools.
  • Flexibility – Most classes are “asynchronous,” which means they are recorded and you watch them at your convenience.
  • Ease – You won’t have to change cities, pay dorm fees, etc., to “move in” to your school’s locale.
  • Adaptability – The legal studies program online allows for students who can’t just quit their job or abandon their parental duties.
  • Accessibility – Critics say the online student won’t have access to professors and other students, but this is not the case. They can email questions and get answers within 48 hours. Chat rooms provide interaction with other law students.

Do your research right before signing up. The legal studies program online has its deficiencies. But it may be the best option for you.

Online legal studies program: Gaining sway

Online legal studies program is being defended by the cream of the crop. Top-tier Washington University broke ranks with the critics and joined the criticized when it offered a master’s in law (LLM) completely online in 2013.

I think if we can deliver legal instruction online to people at a level of quality that mimics what we’re able to do in the classroom, it’s going to be an agent of change over the coming years, even if people don’t want it to be. And the best schools are going to face that, and are going to make what they do better in all their degree programs and instruction, and everybody else is going to be left behind.”
— Kent Syverud, Washington Law School Dean, from Inside Higher Education

Other traditional law schools to break into the online market are:

  • New York Law School
  • Loyola University
  • University of Alabama
  • Vermont Law School

Online Legal Studies Program

Most of the pioneers of distance law school are in California, where laxer rules allow online law grads to take the bar, widely considered the toughest in the nation.

The Founding Fathers were trying to set up a society that was based on the theory that they did not want a tyrant.” — Lecturer on sample constitutional class at Abraham Lincoln University, one of the many law schools in online market today.

 

Online legal studies programs stand up under fire

Online legal studies program have been criticized for lacking in interaction with fellow students and face-to-face encounters with professors, deemed important for the traditional Socratic approach to law school. The American Bar Association has allowed only 12 units of online studies for accredited law schools, which rules on the total online legal studies program. Since most states require you to attend an ABA-accredited school to even take the bar, your options are uphill. Ironically the state with the toughest bar exam, California, is the only state that allows all comers to take the test. A number of online legal studies program students have passed the California bar.

Check out the video: ALU.edu Online Law School – Constitutional Law Class Lecture

 

Legal studies online graduates meet success

Legal studies online graduate, Chris Kouboulakis, didn’t face skepticism about his credentials when he interviewed for his job in the Santa Clara County district attorney’s office.

I thought they would be negative,” the former environmental engineer said to the Los Angeles Times, “but they’ve been great.”

Like many of the other graduates, Kouboulakis, a stay-at-home dad, said internet was his only option for law school.

Legal studies online work for people who can’t:

  • afford a traditional law school
  • pull up stakes and move to a a traditional law school
  • quit their job to study during typical law school hours
  • abandon parental duties but want to study at night

In the video, practicing family attorney Larry David discusses how his education at Concord Law School equaled–and exceeded–traditional law schools.

To be sure, legal studies online presents extra difficulties:

  • Many states don’t allow legal studies online students to take the bar, so you either have to pass California’s bar first and then try in your local state or you take the online classes only to compliment your current career.
  • Traditional law firms look first at students who attend brick and mortar schools.

Why, if other areas of study have embraced the online option, has law education been so resistant? Part of the answer lies in simply protecting turf. The American Bar Association, which accredits schools, has a whole host of rules that favor, not the law student, but the law professor (maximum hourly teaching limits, high wages and perks for professors, etc.). In theory, these rules assure quality. In reality, they are excessive and stifle competition. They also make it impossible for law schools to charge anything but the highest tuition.

Online legal studies: a way for those who otherwise can’t

Online legal studies are the answer for your dream that, up until now, have been frustrated by lack of time, lack of finances, lack of whatever. You can now get your law degree from a number of excellent law schools that are entirely online. To be sure, this option is not without its difficulties. State high courts are currently re-visiting their policies and are expected to lift the ban on online students taking the bar. Do the research in your state by contacting the bar directly (California allows online students to take the bar.)

It was just impossible to go to school at night and take care of the kids,” said a 46-year-old mother of two, who used her online law degree in the entertainment industry.

Consider online legal studies:

  • Enrollment in online legal studies programs have exploded
  • Law schools online have steadily increased
  • Traditional law schools in 2013 are suffering declining enrollments
  • Online is quality, student-oriented education

Online Legal Studies

The American Bar Association, however, has taken a dim view of 100% online legal studies, allowing for traditional schools to give no more than 12 units online. The ABA has many similar rules for accreditation, which is needed in 49 states in order to take the bar. The ABA rules make law education excessively expensive, which is why law schools have raised their prices to beyond imagination. Nowadays, such rules make no sense. The job market is depressed, and with $100,000+ student loan debt from accredited law schools, students are understandably cutting back on applications to brick and mortar law schools.