Wisconsin Online Law Degree: Seeking Your Best Option

Wisconsin Online Law Degree — It’s easier in Wisconsin than most states to take the bar with your online law degree. That’s because the state’s high court allows you to take the bar if you have passed another state’s bar (such as California, which allows online law students to take its bar). That’s easier than most other states which rule out anything but ABA-accredited schools.

Wisconsin Online Law Degree

Why does the ABA not accredit online schools? For lots of reasons: conservative ideas about education could be one reason, protecting its colleagues turf, another. Not until law school applications declined dramatically in 2013 (due to spiraling tuition coupled with dim job prospects), did the ABA consider changing its policies. Announcements of changes are forthcoming.

It’s very important that law schools move into this new technology. It’s a whole new world out there.,” says in the video Ellen Podgor, associate dean at Stetson Law School. “Some of the top universities are requiring their students to take at least one distance learning class in order to graduate. The law schools need to get on the page.”

A Wisconsin Online Law Degree is a good option since:

  • Cheaper tuition matches better the job market. You won’t be saddled with $100,000 of debt typical among traditional law school students.
  • You won’t have to practice law 3-5 years in California before moving back to Wisconsin to solicit “reciprocity by motion” or to take Wisconsin’s bar.
  • The ABA recognizes a huge gap in need for lawyers among the poor.
  • “Asynchronous” classes mean you can watch the lecture at your convenience and even re-wind to hear a part you didn’t understand.
  • Passing the bar is especially difficult for online law school students, but since California’s is considered the toughest in the nation, passing Wisconsin’s afterward could be a slam dunk. Whether you can afford a traditional brick-and-mortar law school or choose the distance learning approach, at the end of the day, it’s all about who prepares himself enough.
  • Feedback is available from faculty and students via email, chat and video conference. In some cases, the response time is even better than the live professor. (How many times have you gone only to find his office door closed and locked?)

The video shows a seminar form the  2004 CALI Conference for Law School Computing Audience: All Technical Level and talks to law educators about the best practices for online learning with this emerging technology.

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